#10 FloraTrendstory

01 Carnation

Spring
Goddess

Photography: Myriam Balaÿ

Spring
Goddess

Like a Greek beauty, thought lost and now resurrected. The carnation with its serrated, fringed and sometimes striped petals is like a curvaceous Goddess. The essence of everything that is feminine. In an era when we are embracing ancient symbolism, it can return to the spotlight with its corset-like calyx and feathery petals_______.

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Foto anjer: Myriam Balaÿ. Deze romantische ‘Flora’ werd ooit met liefde geschilderd door Alexander Roslin (1718-1793) en Kasia Borowieka van @cosmosandplums maakte dit schitterende beeld van anjers onder een teer laagje cellofaan

Sweet bite

Carnations are edible (provided they have not been sprayed) and taste of mild honey with a pinch of clove and nutmeg. Mix them airily through a salad with finely sliced vegetables and baby leaf for a bit of colour and bite. They’re are also tasty in herb butter. And you can use them as edible decoration on your cake. Brush the petals with some beaten egg white, dip them in fine sugar and leave them to dry on baking parchment. That way they will last for ages.

Designer Karl Lagerfeld recently said very appositely at the launch of the Chanel Cruise collection: “Greece is the word. The criteria of beauty in ancient, then classical Greece still hold true. There have never been a more beautiful representation of women. The entire Renaissance, in fact, was based on antiquity. It is really about the youth of the world in all it’s power and unpredictability. Just like the unforgiving gods.” Spot on, because according to trend forecaster Lidewij Edelkoort we will soon be living in the Goddess era, and specifically the Aphrodite moment, which represents the moment when you fall in love; supremely associated with spring. Thereby think of frothy clothes, layers and layers of tulle, playing with volume and shape. And everything this is folded, serrated and crumpled, like rushes, frays and fringes. And then place a carnation next to it… She matches as perfectly as a tailor-made outfit. Turned upside down, she has a calyx-shaped skirt with a focus on the waist and lots of tulle at the bottom. The delicate conflict between the hard stem and the tender petals symbolises the transition from our hardened and bleak times to a forthcoming period of more gentle values and standards. We are moving from woven to knitted, from starched to relaxed. With the ‘vintage’ carnation as a symbol of inclusiveness; even something that was once dated can join in and suddenly becomes a la mode. The ‘oldie’ becomes a ‘goodie’. Why did we not recognise her striking beauty before?

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Video gefilmd door Michelle Duijn, styling Lidewij Smeur, model Vakil Eelman, jurk Claes Iversen. Foto anjer: Myriam Balaÿ. Mode- beeld van de getalenteerde Sarah Moon, Styling: Patty Wilson

Sweet bite

Carnations are edible (provided they have not been sprayed) and taste of mild honey with a pinch of clove and nutmeg. Mix them airily through a salad with finely sliced vegetables and baby leaf for a bit of colour and bite. They’re are also tasty in herb butter. And you can use them as edible decoration on your cake. Brush the petals with some beaten egg white, dip them in fine sugar and leave them to dry on baking parchment. That way they will last for ages.

Divine flower

Greek Goddesses serve as a contemporary role model for young and older women.. Age is viewed as beauty again, and that explains why Greek mythology has become the source of inspiration. How appropriate that the carnation’s botanical name ‘Dianthus’ is also derived from ‘dios’, which means ‘god’. The divine flowers a symbol for silent resistance and revolution. Sexy old is the new good. In a time when we are embracing the symbolism of age, in which we like old furniture and fabrics and come to realise how beautiful an old person is, ‘young at heart’ is becoming the new rule. This is also evidenced by the revolutionary timeline of the 85-year-old Instagrammer @Baddiewinkle (‘stealing your man since 1928’) With its notched, serrated, fringed, coloured and sometimes striped petals and tubular calyx the carnation is equally idiosyncratic. Its exterior betrays its inner youthfulness. With a daring design and refined colour nuances it is an exceptionally welcome dissonance when it comes to beauty and inspiration.

RED CARNATION
A SINGLE RED CARNATION INCARNATE WAVERS IN THE SPRING STORM SPILLING COLOUR INTO THE WIND DEFYING ALL THE ODDS_______.
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Fotografe Thirza Schaap maakte speciaal voor The Green Gallery deze kunstige ‘anjers’ gemaakt van gevonden plastic uit de oceaan

Fotografe Thirza Schaap maakte speciaal voor The Green Gallery deze kunstige ‘anjers’ gemaakt van gevonden plastic uit de oceaan

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Links: ‘Flora’s livingroom anno 2018’, eclectische aquatint etsen met anjers van kunstenaar Rose Electra Harris in opdracht voor The Green Gallery. Rechts: Fotografie Myriam Balay.

Text
Rosanne Loffeld

Floral layering

Fashion designer Cristobal Balenciaga will be delighted. His favourite flower is ‘allowed’ again, this time on a lavish scale in a well-deserved starring role. The Spring 2017 collection already featured statement spandex boots with carnation embroidery and an extreme point. We are curious to find out what he will come up with now. Balmain presents a pink tulle miniskirt which looks remarkably like carnation, and designer Sies Marjan is featuring carnation colours for Spring 2018. Meanwhile the mould-breaking Japanese label 5knot have built their collection on a carnation-like layering with unusual shapes and a host of ruffles on skirts, sleeves and necklines. That sounds sweet, but it particularly looks innovative, airy and feminine. Fanning out like a carnation in a new spring_______.

Text
Rosanne Loffeld